Paid sick time instead of workers’ comp

Paid sick time gives employees options when they do not qualify for workers’ comp benefits.

Governor Rick Snyder has signed legislation (Senate Bill No. 1175) upending a ballot initiate that would have guaranteed paid sick time for Michigan employees. According to the Detroit Free Press, this was an “unprecedented maneuver” by the GOP-controlled Legislature. It adopted a voter-initiated bill to keep it off the November 6, 2018 ballot fully intending to make changes after the election.

Paid sick time has been cut to 1 hour for every 35 hours worked with a maximum of 40 hours per year. Businesses with 50 or fewer employees are now exempted. The ballot proposal would have exempted businesses with 5 or fewer employees. Unfortunately, these significant changes mean far fewer people will get paid sick time.

Here is why you should care about this issue. Mandatory paid sick time would help people hurt on-the-job. An employee must be disabled for at least 7 days before any lost wages are paid under workers’ comp. Paid sick time could help fill this gap. Many of our clients cannot afford to be without pay for a week and this could help tremendously.

Employees who find their workers’ comp claims disputed could also benefit from having paid sick time. This would allow employees to get paid while they fight with an insurance company about workers’ comp benefits. Sick time is considered wage continuation and can be coordinated with workers’ comp benefits. Employees would not be double dipping and the employer would get a credit for these wages.

Michigan Workers Comp Lawyers never charges a fee to evaluate a potential case. Our law firm has represented injured and disabled workers exclusively for more than 35 years. Call (844) 201-9497 for a free consultation today.

Related information:

Can I get vacation or sick time paid back from workers’ comp?

Photo courtesy of Creative Commons, by Brian Reid Furniture.

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