Schedule Loss of Use Chart (Workers’ Compensation Injury Chart) Explained

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Michigan attorney explains specific loss benefits under workers’ comp and how much should be paid for amputation.

Schedule Loss of Use (Workers' Compensation Injury Chart) Explained

Our workers’ comp attorneys want you to know your legal rights. We believe knowledge is power and it’s the best way to make sure everything is paid correctly. Insurance companies frequently make mistakes and they are never in your favor. Here is what you need to know about specific loss benefits and the schedule loss of use chart (workers’ compensation injury chart).

Employees hurt on-the-job are entitled to medical treatment and lost wages. The amount paid will be based upon 80% of your after-tax average weekly wage using the last 39 paid weeks. These are automatic benefits and should be paid regardless of employee fault.

What is Schedule Loss of Use?

Schedule loss of use award or specific loss benefits are the minimum number of weeks that an employee must be paid regardless of ability to work. Michigan law provides a schedule loss of use chart (workers’ compensation injury chart) for amputation. Many insurance adjusters do not follow this Michigan law and will end payment early.

We recommend downloading the amputation chart (Form WC-728) and having it filled out by your doctor. This can be used as proof that specific loss benefits should be paid. Send it to the insurance company by USPS certified mail return receipt requested. Penalties are available if correctly submitted and not timely paid.

Schedule Loss of Use Chart (Workers’ Compensation Injury Chart)

Loss of thumb: 65 weeks
Loss of first finger: 38 weeks
Loss of second finger: 33 weeks
Loss of third finger: 22 weeks
Loss of fourth finger: 16 weeks
Loss of hand: 215 weeks
Loss of arm: 269 weeks

Loss of Great toe: 33 weeks
Loss of other toes: 11 weeks
Loss of foot: 162 weeks
Loss of leg: 215 weeks

Loss of eye: 162 weeks

Potential legal issues

Specific loss benefits are supposed to be paid consecutively and not concurrently. This means that if you lose two fingers in a workplace accident, according to the schedule loss of use chart, you should receive 38 weeks of wage loss for the first finger and then another 33 weeks of wage loss for the second finger.

Another issue is when the insurance company does follow the schedule loss of use chart (workers’ compensation injury chart) which results in them not paying the correct number of weeks based upon where the amputation occurred. For instance, the loss of the first phalange of any finger, shall be equal to the loss of half of that finger, and compensation shall be half of the amount specified above. The loss of more than one phalange should be considered as the loss of the entire finger.

Injured workers who have an amputation can get additional wage loss benefits if they continue to be disabled after the minimum number of weeks have been paid. Wage loss benefits could be owed under a theory of general disability. Do not let the insurance company get away with just paying the minimum amount owed to you from the schedule loss of use chart (workers’ compensation injury) chart above. Call an experienced workers’ comp attorney to find out about your legal rights and the maximum specific loss benefits payable.

Michigan Workers Comp Lawyers never charges a fee to evaluate a potential case. Our law firm has represented injured and disabled workers exclusively for more than 35 years. Call (844) 316-8033 for a free consultation today.

Related information:

Independent medical examination for workers’ compensation: what you need to know

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Author Bio Jeffrey Kaufman

Author
Jeffrey E. Kaufman
Michigan Workers Comp Attorney

Jeffrey E. Kaufman has extensive experience in workers compensation cases and has recovered millions of dollars in benefits for his clients. He believes all injured workers deserve to be on equal footing with insurance companies and employers, and fights tenaciously so their rights are secured and protected.


“Jeff also helped me with getting my Blue Cross bills paid. I would absolutely recommend him and the whole firm. Jeff and the firm did everything they were supposed to do for me and my case.”
Ricardo Perfetto

Hundreds of 5-Star Reviews

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Get Help From our Michigan Workers’ Comp Lawyers Today

You’re not alone. Our Michigan workers’ comp lawyers have been called the best in the state, and our clients love how they’re treated with care, respect, and responsiveness. We will give you the time you need, we will explain your legal rights, and we will always treat you with respect.

Our workers’ compensation and Social Security disability lawyers always put your needs first. Get to know your legal team.

Our attorneys post regularly about common issues related to workers’ comp, including common injuries, settlement calculations, laws, and more.

Injured? It’s Time to Get Some Answers

Don’t let the insurance adjuster push you around. Request your free consultation today.

"*" indicates required fields

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Our attorneys post regularly about common issues related to workers’ comp, including common injuries, settlement calculations, laws, and more.

Our workers’ compensation and Social Security disability lawyers always put your needs first. Get to know your legal team.